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    Career Pathways
     
    How can the Career Technical Education courses at New San Juan assist in your education?
     
     
    Our goal at New San Juan High School is to prepare every student for success after high school with whichever path they choose to follow. One of our means to reach this goal is the Career Technical Education (CTE) courses, which provides real-world skills and engages students to apply knowledge learned in a text book to real situations and projects.
     
     
    At New San Juan, it’s not College or Career, but rather college and career working together. Whether a student is applying for an entry-level position out of school or applying for a university, they will need additional skills for their resume and portfolio. Skills learned in the career pathways can also help students land jobs while enrolled at a college to assist with tuition and living expenses.
     
     
    Students will choose one of the five pathways offered at New San Juan High School and leave school prepared, not only for college and career, but to responsibly contribute to a radically evolving world.
     
     
    Please follow the links to each pathway for more information, including projects, classes and certifications each path offers New San Juan students.
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    CAREER PATHWAY – FRESHMAN ACADEMY
    (GRADE 9) Freshman Academy gives students the opportunity to participate in an introduction to each of
    our pathways: Construction Technology, Culinary Arts/Hospitality Management, Innovation Design,
    Media Production and Transportation Technology. Students will spend approximately 6 weeks in each
    course and then rotate.
     
     
    CAREER PATHWAY – CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY
    The construction technology program leads to a skills certificate, job placement, or higher education
    opportunities. Graduates will be well prepared to work or continue their education in architecture,
    building inspection technology, or construction management. Students will learn carpentry
    technology, blueprint reading, land preparation, basic plumbing and electrical installations, roofing
    as well as safety and first-aid procedures.
     
     

    NCCER Certification
    National Center for Construction Education and Research – The purpose of the NCCER Curricula is to
    provide training that will ensure the continued flow of skilled craft workers into the workforce. The
    intent is to develop a commonly utilized training process that includes the efficient and consistent
    development, updating, and delivery of construction curricula. Learn more at www.NCCER.org.
     
     

    Wood Specialties (10 credits)
    (Grades 10) Year one of a three year sequence woodworking specialties sets the foundation for the
    construction program at San Juan High School. Students will learn to follow architectural design plans,
    layout and installation of cabinets, utilize technology and computer software (Auto Cad and Microsoft
    Projects). They will learn to interpret and read blueprints, develop construction techniques, and learn
    basic hand and power tool safety. Students learn to manage their projects within a company format,
    identify requests for proposals and provide written proposals.
     
     
     
    Construction Technology 1(10 credits)
    (meets UC “g” requirement/CSU elective requirement)
    (Grades 11) Year two of a three year sequence focuses on the industry from an introductory approach.
    Students learn carpentry technology, use of measuring instruments and basic hand and power tool safety.
    They will participate in concrete work, wood framing, steel stud framing basics, plumbing and electrical
    installations as well as roofing, exterior and interior finishing. An emphasis is placed on basic
    construction management and career exploration.
     
     
     
    Advanced Construction Technology (20 credits)
    (meets UC “g” requirement/CSU elective requirement)
    (Grade 12) Year three of the sequence focuses on job performance and industry standards. Building
    codes, estimating, sustainable building process and techniques, project management and advanced
    carpentry techniques. Students will learn site survey and layout, footings and foundations, floor
    systems, stick framing layout and assembly, stairs and landings and roof systems. Students will manage
    their project and determine all costs, materials needed and request and accept bid proposals. This
    program is designed to prepare students for employment at an apprentice level with a focus on
    reachability.
     
     
     

    CAREER PATHWAY - HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
    The award winning Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management pathway prepares students to enter a community college, a four year university, a technical school and the world of work. Students are able to earn college credit towards a food service and management or culinary arts degree at Johnson and Wales University and The Culinary Institute of America. Scholarships, internships, competitive events, and national certification are part of the program.
     
     
    Foods and Nutrition I – Introduction to Culinary Arts (5 credits)
    (Grade 10) Students in Foods I learn basics of nutrition and cooking skills, the art of entertaining, how to plan and prepare meals and the fundamentals of good eating habits. Normally food is prepared and served two to three times a week. Teacher demonstrations, as well as student directed food preparation, are integral to the course. During the various holiday seasons special types of cooking projects are introduced.
     
     
    Foods and Nutrition II - Advanced Culinary Principles (5 credits)
    (Grade 10) Foods II will emphasize foods from other nations as well as various regions within the United States. Preparation of baked goods (yeast breads, cakes and cake decorating) will also be included. Food garnishes and presentation will be covered as well as current consumer and nutritional issues. Food service careers will be explored and investigated.
     
     

    Catering (10 credits)
    (Grade 11-12) Catering will prepare students for entry level positions common to the catering industry. The course builds on the successful completion of the foundation culinary arts courses and is designed to give students classroom instruction and applied practice in planning, preparing, and serving catered events, effectively managing a beverage service facility and developing a passion for the hospitality industry. Students will develop skills through hands on authentic application of industry standards.
     
     

    Introduction to Culinary Arts (20 credits)
    (meets UC “g” requirement/CSU elective requirement)
    (Grade 11) An advanced culinary arts skills course that explores the concepts and practices utilized in the food service industry. Students will earn a California Food Handler Card, required by all California food service employees based on food safety and sanitation. Students learn about food safety and sanitation, industry equipment, advanced food preparation, table service and customer relations through ProStart, a curriculum designed for high school students by the National Restaurant Association. Students will participate in presentations by food service industry speakers, and learn about the industry
    in field trips. Through hands-on activities, students cater events, manage the on-campus restaurant, Thermopylae, prepare a professional portfolio, and develop leadership skills through FHA-HERO: The California Affiliate of FCCLA and compete in regional and statewide culinary arts competitions.
     
     
     
    Culinary Arts Occupations II (20 credits)
    (Grade12) An advanced culinary arts skills course that completes the Culinary Arts Occupations sequence of courses. Students learn about careers in the foodservice and hospitality industry, menu planning, purchasing and inventory, cost and profitability, and marketing in the industry and practice advanced food preparation techniques. Students can compete on the ProStart Culinary and Management teams. Students can earn the National Restaurant Association’s Certificate of Achievement and qualify for PAID internships. Students will also cater events, manage the on-campus restaurant, Thermopylae, continue polishing their portfolio, and develop leadership skills through FHA-HERO: The California Affiliate of FCCLA.
     
     
    Bakery Academy I (20 credits)
    (Grade 11) An advanced Baking and Pastry course which emphasizes skills used in a professional bakery. Students will earn a California Food Handler Card, required by all California food service employees based on safety and sanitation. In addition, proper usage and care of industry equipment: mixers, sheeter, proof-box and convection ovens is practiced. Students also study the function of all baking ingredients and why products are successful or not. Students will individually produce all types of breads, cookies, cheesecakes, laminated doughs such as pastries and croissants and plated desserts. Students will create a professional portfolio, and have an opportunity to develop leadership skills through participation in FHA-HERO: The California Affiliate of FCCLA. Customer orders, competition in FHA-HERO and catering events are part of the course.
     
     
    Bakery Academy II (20 credits)
    (Grade12) An advanced Baking and Pastry course with an emphasis in decorating skills completes the two year sequence. Students will learn to bake many types of cakes, use a variety of icings from butter cream through rolled fondant to create simple cakes through complex wedding cakes. Chocolate desserts, patisserie items and gingerbread houses add additional experience in problem solving. Costing out the ingredients using standard and metric culinary math and recipes/formulas are used to price a product. The National Restaurant Association ServSafe Food Protection Manager Certification can be earned along with valuable internship experience. Students will make products for Thermopylae, the coffee/juice bar, numerous customer orders and competitions. The Level 2 student will leave the year with life-long skills ready for an occupation in Baking and Pastry, culinary school or a successful hobby.
     
     
     
     
    CAREER PATHWAY – INNOVATION DESIGN
    This pathway provides students the opportunity to learn about drafting, design, and product innovation. Students will develop critical thinking skills through a variety of multimodal, problem-solving techniques. Students will gain hands-on skills in product design and innovation, measurement systems, shop safety, and beginning materials and tools.
     
     
    Introduction to Innovation Design(10 credits)
    (meets UC “g” requirement/CSU elective requirment)
    (Grade 10) This course represents a contextualized, laboratory-based, integrated curriculum opportunity for high school students enrolled in this pathway, to learn about drafting, design, and product innovation. Students will develop critical thinking skills through a variety of multimodal, problem-solving techniques. Students will gain hands-on skills in product design and innovation, measurement systems, shop safety practices, and beginning materials and tools, including the following: wood, textiles, and alternative materials. Students will use the design thinking process from Stanford d.School, which includes the following: empathize, define, ideate, prototype, and test. The integrated content focuses on competence in an age of rapidly advancing technology and providing students with the basis for making wise academic and career choices.
     
     
     
    Innovation Design and Manufacturing (10 credits)
    (meets UC “g” requirement/CSU elective requirement)
    (Grade 11) This course provides students with the opportunity to focus on one or more areas of industrial technology, creatively pursuing new knowledge or solving technological problems, by designing and building prototypes and working models. Students will be manufacturing in the areas of forming, joining, assembling metals; as well as focusing on electronics, robotics, pneumatics, mechatronics, and prototyping which includes hands on use of manufacturing equipment and applied robotics and automation. Students will read, write and analyze engineering drawings, set up and operate common manufacturing machines (shaping using the mill, lathe, welder, etc.), summarize and utilize best practices for operating hand tools found in a common machine shop or hacker lab. Ultimately, students learn and apply appropriate information in order to complete a project and test it.

     
     
    Advanced Innovation Design and Manufacturing (10 credits) (meets UC “g” requirement/CSU elective)
    This course provides students with the opportunity to focus on one or more areas of industrial technology, creatively pursuing new knowledge or solving technological problems, by designing and building prototypes and working models. Students will develop their skills in AutoCAD, Inventor, and REVIT, in order to draw and design mechanical and architectural plans. Students will be manufacturing in the areas of forming, joining, 3d printing, bonding, milling, etc.; students will read, write, draw, create and analyze engineering drawings, set up and operate manufacturing machines (3d printer, CNC lasers and routers, 3d laser scanners) summarize and utilize best practices for operating hand tools found in a common machine shop or hacker lab. Ultimately, students learn and apply appropriate information in order to complete a project and test it.
     
     
     
     
    CAREER PATHWAY – MEDIA ARTS
    The Media Arts pathway offers a chance to learn essential graphic design tools used to produce videos, create digital animation and learn what it takes to manage the creative process from concept development, to marketing and production. Students will take advantage of the latest hardware and software, and have the opportunity to produce real world projects for professional clients.
     

    Digital Imaging (10 credits)
    (Grade 10)This is the introductory course to the pathway and introduces students to the technical and artistic elements of photography, digital image editing, video editing and graphic design. Students will
    learn to use and care for advanced digital SLR cameras to develop their visual storytelling skills while creating their own online portfolios. Essential design tools such as Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, I Movie, Final Cut Pro and other software is used.
     
     
     
    Digital Media (10 credits)
    (Grade 11) This course explores digital video production from concept to finished product. Students learn advanced storytelling techniques found in documentaries, commercials and narrative forms while using state of the art high definition equipment, modern computers and industry standard professional software. The curriculum revolves around project based assignments wherein students work as a team to write, shoot, direct, and edit their own documentary, narrative, or experimental videos for a daily bulletin. Students work with advanced equipment including a multi camera, state of the art recording studio, and an editing suite containing industry recognized software.
     
     
     
    Television Occupations (20 credits)
    (Grade 12)Television and multimedia production explores the conceptual skills, equipment and techniques utilized in television and film production. Students write, shoot, direct, and edit their own documentary, narrative, or experimental videos as well as produce videos for outside sources. Students continue working with multiple and single camera techniques and learn how to produce multi camera productions out of the studio. Students will also experience the development of supporting computer graphics, and develop web site designs using state of the art facilities.
     
     
     
    CAREER PATHWAY -TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGY
    The Transportation Technology pathway provides instruction and hands-on experience with the operation of repair facilities; repair skills for National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) specialties, and installation methods for aftermarket electronics. Paid work and internships are part of the program, offering students valuable experience and an entry into the profession. The program leads to Automotive Service Excellence and Regional Occupation Program skill certificates and will prepare students to continue their education in automotive engineering, diesel mechanics, or transportation research and design.
     

    Introduction to Automotive Technology (10 credits)
    (Grade 10) Intro to Automotive Technology is an introductory automotive mechanic course that introduces students to automobile service and repair, shop safety, engine repair, automatic transmissions and transaxles, manual drive train and axles, suspension and steering, brakes, electrical and electronic systems, heating and air conditioning, and engine performance. Upon completion of this course, students will possess both personal and professional automotive industry knowledge. This course will provide students with the opportunity to apply and extend concepts studied in their math and science classes (related to algebra, basic arithmetic, physics, electrical, computer, and chemical sciences) to the automotive technology industry.
     
     
     
    Auto MLR I (30 credits)
    Pre-requisite of a “C” or better in Intro to Auto Technician (meets UC “g” requirement/USC elective requirement)
    (Grade 11/12) This course is a beginning automotive mechanic course that covers service and repair, shop safety, tool safety, engine repair, automatic transmission and transaxle, manual drive train, and axles, suspension and steering, brakes, electrical, heating and air conditioning, and engine performance. After completion of this course, students will be prepared for an entry level position in todays’ automotive services industry and to advance to ROP job site placement via Auto MLR II. This course will provide students with the opportunity to apply and extend concepts studied in their math and science classes (related to algebra, basic arithmetic, physics, and electrical, computer and chemical sciences) to the automotive technology industry.
     
     
     
    Auto MLR II (30 credits) (meets UC “g” requirement/CSU elective requirement)
    (Grade 11/12) This course is an designed as the second of a two course sequence that continues instruction in automobile service and repair, shop safety, engine repair, automatic transmissions and transaxles, manual drive train and axles, suspension and steering, brakes, electrical and electronic systems, heating and air conditioning, and engine performance. After completion of this course, students will be prepared for an entry level position in today’s automotive services industry, beginning ASE certification and will have completed the NATEF MLR curriculum. This course will provide students with the opportunity to apply and extend concepts studied in their math and science classes (related to algebra, basic arithmetic, physics, and electrical, computer, and chemical sciences) to the automotive technology industry.
Last Modified on June 21, 2018