About Community College

  • CCC Community colleges are often overlooked as every student's backup choice or as nothing more than a setting for a popular television show. However, going down a non-traditional path, such as enrolling in a community college, can often be more beneficial to students than forcing themselves down the traditional path.
     
    The name comes from the fact the colleges primarily attract students from the local community. Also known as junior colleges, city colleges or technical colleges, community colleges offer higher education, as well as lower-level tertiary education. Community colleges grant certificates, diplomas and associate degrees. They also offer continuing and adult education and are supported by local tax revenue.
     
    The type of education and goals at community colleges are a bit different, too. In addition to more common areas of study at universities, community colleges offers more specific career and technical education, focusing on training in certain industries. Study at community colleges only takes two years on average. Afterwards, students often transfer to four-year universities, where they earn bachelor's degrees after only two or three years. Some community colleges align themselves and their programs with those of a local university, so be sure to research all possibilities.
     
    City One big stigma regarding community colleges is that, if you go to a community college or don't go to a four-year university straight out of high school, you are a failure. The truth is quite the opposite. Each student is unique, with their own path in life. Different students have different needs and paths to their desired careers. A lot of the time, students aiming for certain careers are often better set going to community college for training versus getting a degree from a four-year university. Many students who have underachieved in high school often mature and gain proper focus and study habits later on. Community colleges offer those students a deserved second chance at education. In short, it is not wrong to go to community college, and many experts say it may even be the better path.
     
    For more information, visit the California Community Colleges website
Last Modified on June 9, 2015